Occasional Reports

Standalone reports published independently from the Global Taiwan Brief

Quarterly Connections: Quarter 3, 2022

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to release the first edition of Quarterly Connections, a new online periodical published every three months by GTI focused on analyzing global developments and their strategic relations to Taiwan. 

In this first issue, we examine how elections in both the Philippines and South Korea may affect those countries’ approaches to the Taiwan Strait, the implications of NATO’s 2022 “Strategic Concept” for Taiwan, and the effects of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan on elite perceptions in Southeast Asia.

US-Taiwan Relations in the 21st Century: Building the Foundation for a Global Partnership

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of a new occasional report by contributors Executive Director Russell Hsiao, Senior Non-Resident Fellow Alexander Gray, and Advisory Board Member Robert Wang entitled “US-Taiwan Relations in the 21st Century: Building the Foundation for a Global Partnership.”

US policy towards the Indo-Pacific is intended to promote both democracy and a new economic framework for the region, as well as to maintain longstanding American commitments to Taiwan. This report examines ways that the United States—in consultation with Taiwan and like-minded partners—can help Taiwan strengthen relations with its diplomatic and non-diplomatic partners, actively participate in international organizations, and expand its regional and global economic ties.

Mutual Legal Assistance in the Digital Age and Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of a new policy backgrounder co-authored by Executive Director Russell Hsiao and Program Assistant Zoe Weaver-Lee entitled “Mutual Legal Assistance in the Digital Age and Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy.”

Despite its efforts, Taiwan continues to lack access to key international organizations focused on combating transnational crime, cybersecurity, and law enforcement cooperation— particularly INTERPOL. Yet, considering the new and complex threats posed by transnational cybercrime, Taiwan’s ability to establish mutual legal assistance treaties (MLAT) is paramount. To this end, Taiwan’s revitalized New Southbound Policy—with its emphasis on South and Southeast Asia’s growing economic and digital footprints—presents an ideal platform for establishing and deepening such cooperation.

This policy backgrounder not only seeks to illustrate the importance of MLATs as criminal activity becomes more digitized, but also highlights existing partnerships and platforms that have proven successful in combating transnational cybercrime as well as their challenges.

Connecting Taiwan's New Southbound Policy with US Foreign Policy Initiatives in Asia: Recommendations for Taipei and Washington

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI), in partnership with the Taiwan-Asia Exchange Foundation (TAEF), is very pleased to announce the release of a new joint report co-authored by Russell Hsiao and Robert Wang entitled “Connecting Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy with US Foreign Policy Initiatives in Asia: Recommendations for Taipei and Washington.” Mr. Hsiao is the executive director at GTI, while Mr. Wang is a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and a member of GTI’s Advisory Board.

Taiwan’s president, Tsai Ing-wen, has placed significant emphasis on the New Southbound Policy (NSP) as her administration’s signature foreign policy initiative since assuming office in 2016. The NSP, which aims to bolster Taiwan’s economic, political, and cultural ties with the nations of South Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Zealand, has resulted in a marked increase in Taiwan’s engagements with the region. This shift has helped to bring Taiwan’s foreign policy into greater alignment with that of the United States, which has increasingly shifted focus to the Indo-Pacific region in recent years. While officials in Taipei and Washington have talked a lot about their shared interests, Taiwan and the United States have done relatively little to coordinate their approaches to the Indo-Pacific. This report seeks to highlight complementary features between the NSP and US foreign policy initiatives in Asia, with the goal of providing concrete recommendations for strengthening and expanding cooperation between the two governments and civil societies.

Urban Governance in East Asia: Lessons from Taiwan's Open Green Program

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of a new occasional report by Professor Jeffrey Hou, entitled “Urban Governance in East Asia: Lessons from Taiwan’s Open Green Program.” Dr. Hou is a professor and former chair of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington, Seattle, and a recipient of the GTI Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan.

Despite its small size, Taiwan has emerged as regional economic and industrial powerhouse. This evolution has been driven in large part by Taiwan’s cities, which have become the linchpins of the island’s growing high-tech economy. However, such urban growth should not come at the expense of sustainable development. In his report, Professor Hou examines the Open Green Matching Fund program in Taipei. Unlike typical urban regeneration approaches that focus on large-scale urban redevelopment, the Open Green program provides funding for neighborhood and community groups to engage in bottom-up, community-drive placemaking projects that improve local environments.

David and Goliath: Strengthening Taiwan's Deterrence and Resiliency

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of a new occasional report by Lieutenant General Wallace “Chip” Gregson (ret.), Russell Hsiao, and Ambassador Stephen M. Young (ret.), entitled “David and Goliath: Strengthening Taiwan’s Deterrence and Resiliency.” Lt. Gen. Gregson, a member of GTI’s Advisory Board, previously served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs at the Department of Defense, while Amb. Young was formerly Ambassador to the Kyrgyz Republic, Director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and Consul General to Hong Kong. He is also a member of GTI’s Advisory Board. Mr. Hsiao currently serves as the Executive Director of GTI.

As the new American administration sets out its agenda with US allies and partners to preserve and promote the rules-based order, it will have a natural partner in Taiwan. Tsai Ing-wen was reelected as President of Taiwan in January 2020—formally known as the Republic of China (ROC)—with a popular mandate. As a democratic ally and vital security partner of the United States, Washington and Taipei have many reasons to deepen their ties. This report provides policymakers in Washington and Taipei with a common reference point that both identifies the challenges as well as proposes some recommendations to ensure common purpose and policy objectives going forward.

Taiwan's Disaster Preparedness and Response: Strengths, Shortfalls, and Paths to Improvement

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report by Leo Bosner and I-wei Jennifer Chang, entitled “Disaster Preparedness and Response in Taiwan: Strengths, Shortfalls, and Paths to Improvement.” Mr. Bosner was previously an Emergency Management Specialist with the US Federal Emergency Management Agency and a 2018 recipient of the GTI Taiwan Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan. Ms. Chang is a research fellow at GTI.

Taiwan is at risk from numerous types of natural disasters, including floods, typhoons, earthquakes. This occasional report provides an overview of Taiwan’s disaster preparedness and response since 1999, when a powerful earthquake struck the island on September 21 and killed more than 2,000 people. The 1999 earthquake exposed key inefficiencies in the central government’s disaster response, leading the government to initiate several reforms to its national emergency management system.

A Case Study of Recent Social Movements in Hong Kong and Taiwan: Convergence of Counter-Identities amid China’s Rise

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report by Dr. Christina Lai, entitled “A Case Study of Recent Social Movements in Hong Kong and Taiwan: Convergence of Counter-Identities amid China’s Rise.” Dr. Lai is an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University and a recent recipient of the GTI Taiwan Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan.

Dr. Lai’s report provides extensive analysis of three recent social movements: The Sunflower Movement in Taiwan, as well as Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement and anti-extradition bill protests. In doing so, she investigates social, cultural, and political linkages between demonstrators in the two democracies, exploring the ways in which these movements have influenced one another.

A Survey of Public Perceptions on Diplomatic Recognition of Taiwan

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report by Dr. Timothy S. Rich, entitled “A Survey of Public Perceptions on Diplomatic Recognition of Taiwan.” Dr. Rich is an associate professor of political science at Western Kentucky University and a recipient of the GTI Taiwan Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan.

Dr. Rich’s in-depth report explores Taiwanese public perceptions toward and evaluates the main actors as well as conditions influencing diplomatic recognition of Taiwan. This study examines these timely questions through probit regression analysis and original experimental web surveys in Taiwan.

Taiwan Miracle Redux: Navigating Economic Challenges in a Contested Democracy

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report co-authored by Ryan Terribilini and Tze-Ting Huang, entitled “Taiwan Miracle Redux: Navigating Economic Challenges in a Contested Democracy.” Mr. Terribilini is the CEO and co-founder of Formosa Financial and a recipient of the GTI Taiwan Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan, and Ms. Huang is a student at National Chengchi University.

Terribilini and Huang’s research examines the differences in the policy making process under one-party rule versus the contested multi-party status quo to develop an understanding of the effect that Taiwan’s democratic system of governance has had on its economic development while providing recommendations on potential areas for reform or improvement.

Surveying the Taiwanese Psychology on Self-Defense and Self-Determination

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report authored Dr. Austin Horng-En Wang, an assistant professor of Political Science at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, entitled “Surveying the Taiwanese Psychology on Self-Defense and Self-Determination.” Dr. Wang is a recipient of GTI’s Taiwan Scholarship, which enables researchers to conduct short-term field research in Taiwan. Dr. Wang’s research offers insights into Taiwanese perceptions on self-defense and self-determination based on an original survey.

Transitional Justice in Taiwan A Belated Reckoning with the White Terror

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of the occasional report published by the Foreign Policy Research Institute entitled “Transitional Justice in Taiwan A Belated Reckoning with the White Terror.” Authored by Foreign Policy Research Institute Research Associate Thomas Shattuck, who is a recipient of Global Taiwan Institute’s 2019 Taiwan Scholarship, the report provides a detailed look at the authoritarian period in Taiwan and offers recommendations on how the country should reckon with its past and move forward.

Blinding the Enemy: CCP Interference in Taiwan’s Democracy

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of our latest occasional report entitled “Blinding the Enemy: CCP Interference in Taiwan’s Democracy.” Co-authored by American Enterprise Institute Resident Scholar Gary Schmitt and GTI Senior Non-Resident Fellow Michael Mazza, the report provides a detailed overview of how the People’s Republic of China (PRC) is interfering in Taiwan’s democracy and provides recommendations for ways to counter Chinese Communist Party (CCP) influence operations on the island.

Taiwan's Indigenous Defense Industry: Centralized Control of Abundant Suppliers

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of this occasional report entitled, “Taiwan’s Indigenous Defense Industry: Centralized Control of Abundant Suppliers,” written by Senior Research Fellow David An, Matt Schrader editor-in-chief of the China Brief at the Jamestown Foundation, and MA candidate at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies Ned Collins-Chase.

Enhancing Taiwan’s Role in Asia under the Trump Administration

The Global Taiwan Institute (GTI) is very pleased to announce the release of this occasional report entitled, “Enhancing Taiwan’s Role in Asia under the Trump Administration,” written by Senior Research Fellow David An.